Bangkoks Sathorn Unique abandoned skyscraper: the supervillain HQ of your dreams (sitios fantasma XXV)


Sathorn Unique ghost tower in downtown Bangkok - RIDING OUT THE ECONOMY the adventure chronicle
Sathorn Unique ghost tower in downtown Bangkok - RIDING OUT THE ECONOMY the adventure chronicle

Are you an enterprising crime lord looking to house 50 stories worth of henchmen? Why don’t you check the Sathorn Unique ghost skyscraper in Bangkok, Thailand? No one lives there, and it’s got a rooftop terrace perfect for villainous showdowns.

The Sathorn Unique has the proper mix of glitzy (balustrades) and gritty (plants growing on the 30th floor) necessary for any B-movie mustache-twirler or videogame boss. It was abandoned after the Asian economic crisis of the mid-90s. From Riding Out The Economy

vía Bangkoks Sathorn Unique abandoned skyscraper: the supervillain HQ of your dreams.

Sathorn Unique – Abandoned Skyscraper – RIDING OUT THE ECONOMY, the adventure chronicle

Last weekend, Cengiz and I were plumb out of ideas for cheap, local adventures. So, we decided to go looking for Bangkok’s best pizza and to head to the Grand Palace to do some time lapse filming. On the way there, we got a little side tracked. As we rode the BTS toward the mighty Chao Phraya, zombie like gazes directed out the window, the Sathorn Unique entered our lives. It sits, sadly, naked, just beside the BTS line, towering above everything around it. Cengiz looked at me and said, “You see that graffiti in the building? We can get up there. We should go up there.” It was a silly comment to make, probably made half jokingly; after all, sneaking into abandoned construction projects is probably pretty illegal. Unfortunately, I agreed, wholeheartedly.

At more than 40 stories, Sathorn Unique towers over its surroundings in a largely residential neighborhood in central Bangkok. forum.skyscraperpage.com
At more than 40 stories, Sathorn Unique towers over its surroundings in a largely residential neighborhood in central Bangkok. forum.skyscraperpage.com

The building is among the major construction projects started when Thailand’s economy was booming in the 1990s. – forum.skyscraperpage.com
Developers envisaged a city of gleaming office and residential skyscrapers that were testament to the nation’s rapid development.

Then Thailand sank into a swamp of reckless investments and unpaid debts that became known as the 1997 Asian financial crisis. The country’s economy contracted 10% in 1998 and many of the building projects came to a crashing halt.

Bangkok, Thailand : Abandoned Skyscraper – Sathorn Unique Aint Worth Shit Yo

Abandoned skyscraper, Bangkok, Thailand. Fifty levels, of abandonded skyscraper. Wood flooring installed, bathroom suites connected, wiring, plumbing, fire safety systems, all done. Prime realestate on the river-bank downtown, with spectacular views. The “Sathorn Unique” was to be one of Bangkok’s most exclusive residential developments. Like many other sites, constuction was abandoned during the asian financial crisis of the late 90’s. As with food, Asian’s do financial crisis’s way better than us whiteys. How many skyscrapers were abandoned during the recent GFC? None. Think about it. Standing on a fifity level, almost completed skyscaper, some Thai guy says “fuck it man, lets just go eat some fried chicken. Yo! Kasit, Suthep, Sui Min…drop your helmets bitches! We’re gettin’ the fuck out of here! This building aint worth shit yo”.

Sathorn Unique Tower is our first residential project in downtown Bangkok

Enlace al Mapa en wiki.worldflicks.org

Abandoned Mountain Town of Sardinia, Italy (Sitios fantasma XXIII) – 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities – WebUrbanist


Town of Sardinia, Italy - WebUrbanist
Town of Sardinia, Italy - WebUrbanist

Abandoned Mountain Town of Sardinia, Italy

Little is available online about this picturesque deserted mountain, mountain with brightly painted doors and largely intact structures. Know more?

Feel free to discuss and link in the comments!

vía 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities Abandoned Mountain Town of Sardinia, Italy – WebUrbanist.

Sardinia – De Wikipedia

Sardinia (pronounced /sɑrˈdɪniə/ItalianSardegna[sarˈdeɲɲa]SardinianSardigna or Sardinnya [sarˈdinja]) is the second-largestisland in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily and before Cyprus). It is an autonomous region of Italy, and the nearest land masses are (clockwise from north) the French island of Corsica, the Italian PeninsulaSicilyTunisia and the Spanish Balearic Islands.

The name Sardinia is from the pre-Roman noun *sard[ ], romanised as sardus (feminine sarda); that the name had a religious connotation is suggested from its use also as the adjective for the ancient Sardinian mythological hero-god Sardus Pater “Sardinian Father” (misunderstood by many modern Sardinians/Italians as being “Father Sardus”), as well as being the stem of the adjective “sardonic“. Sardinia was called Ichnusa, the Latinised form of the Greek HyknusaSandalionSardinia and Sardo by the ancient Greeks and the Romans.

Ogliastra hinterland – abandoned towns and ancient towers

On friday the 28th the sea was livelier than we wanted to be part of, and we decided on an excursion by car to the mountains in the Ogliastra hinterland.

First we drove to Jerzu which is a bit further inland from Cardedu, where the mountains really begins. Francesco drove up some of the steepest and most curved roads I have ever been on, up to what is called the “Tacchi di Ogliastra”, meaning the high heels of Ogliastra. They are a series of mountains where the top is surrounded by vertical rock walls of maybe 100-200m. The mountains in Sardinia aren’t high by Himalayan standards, the tallest peaks are just over 1800m, but they’re still impressive in all their ruggedness.

The many vertical rock walls are a little paradise for climbers, who come from all over to play in the Sardinian mountains.

VACATIONS IN SARDINIA

One of the two large islands that lie of the western (Mediterranean) coast of Italy, Sardinia is much less explored and far emptier than its southern neighbour Sicily. Marooned between Italy and north Africa, it lies some 200km off the coast of Lazio. At its northern tip it gazes just a few miles across the water to the French island of Corsica. DH Lawrence visited in the early 1920s and found it ‘lost between Europe and Africa and belonging to nowhere’.

SARDINIA HISTORY

Perhaps the geographical confusion is accentuated by the number of times Sardinia has been invaded over the past two millennia. The island has certainly been inhabited since prehistoric times. You don’t have to dig to find this; the evidence is all over Sardinia in the shape of the bizarre nuraghi, conical stone buildings, rather like beehives. They were mainly constructed between 1500BC and 500BC, apparently as defensive structures as well as homes. This ancient culture was at its height around 1000 years before the birth of Christ … the fact that 700 of the nuraghi survive 3000 years later gives an indication of their power.

But as the civilisations around the Mediterranean gained bigger, faster ships, so islands such as Sardinia became targets for invasion. Around the eighth century BC, the Nuraghi were trading with the Phoenicians, but around 600BC they were invaded by Carthage, who made the short hop from North Africa. The Romans came next of course, and the Sard people were all but wiped out in a bloody campaign in 176BC, when 25,000 islanders were slaughtered.

Abandoned War-Torn City of Agdam, Azerbaijan (Sitios fantasma XXII) – 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities – WebUrbanist


Agdam, (abandoned) capital city of Azerbaijan - WebUrbanist
Agdam, (abandoned) capital city of Azerbaijan - WebUrbanist

Abandoned War-Torn City of Agdam, Azerbaijan

Once the proud 150,000+ capital city of Azerbaijan this dense and thriving city was taken by the Armenians and utterly trashed, vandalized and then abandoned. However, the Armenians still claim the territory as their own so no one has returned to reclaim the wrecked and ravished ruins of the city. However, some explorers still make their way to photograph what is left of this city whose residents may never see it again.

vía 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities Abandoned War-Torn City of Agdam, Azerbaijan – WebUrbanist.

Agdam, Azerbaijan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see Agdam (disambiguation).

Coordinates39°59′35″N 46°55′50″E

Ağdam

Ağdam is located in Azerbaijan

Ağdam
Coordinates: 39°59′35″N 46°55′50″E
Country Azerbaijan
Rayon Agdam
Population (2008)
– Total 0

Ağdam (also, Agdam and Aghdam) was a town in the southwestern part of Azerbaijan and the capital of its Agdam Rayon. In July 1993, after heavy fighting, Agdam was captured by the forces of the Nagorno Karabakh Republic during its 1993 summer offensives. As the town fell, its entire population fled eastwards. In the immediate aftermath of the fighting, the Armenian forces decided to destroy much of Agdam to prevent its recapture by Azerbaijan.[1] More damage occurred in the following decades when the deserted town was looted for building materials. Agdam is currently a ruinous, uninhabited ghost town.[2] The town’s large mosque also survives in bad condition.[3]

View of the destruction caused by war - Wikipedia
View of the destruction caused by war - Wikipedia

Abandoned Disaster City of Beichuan, China (Sitios fantasma XX) – 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities – WebUrbanist


Top, a view of the earthquake-damaged city of Beichuan on May 12. Below, the view on Tuesday, after a controlled drainage operation flooded parts of the damaged city. Liu Jin/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images - The New York Times
Top, a view of the earthquake-damaged city of Beichuan on May 12. Below, the view on Tuesday, after a controlled drainage operation flooded parts of the damaged city. Liu Jin/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images - The New York Times

Abandoned Disaster City of  Beichuan, China

A sudden and devastating earthquake leveled or unbalanced virtually every major building in Beichuan, leaving thousands dead and tens of thousands displaced to public buildings in nearby cities. Due to the extent of the damage it is unclear whether this city will be rebuilt or simply left to go to ruin – its reconstruction would require the leveling of most or all of the buildings that remain from the disaster.

vía 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities Abandoned Disaster City of Beichuan, China – WebUrbanist.

Rescuers carry a survivor from the rubble of a collapsed building in Yinghua town in southwest China's Sichuan province on Friday. www.msnbc.msn.com
Rescuers carry a survivor from the rubble of a collapsed building in Yinghua town in southwest China's Sichuan province on Friday. http://www.msnbc.msn.com

Mapping the earthquake zone

More than 71,000 people are dead, missing or buried under rubble following the devastating earthquake that hit China’s Sichuan province. Click on the map to find out more about some of the worst-affected places.

Beichuan rises from ashes after ’08 Sichuan disaster

BEICHUAN — The Beichuan county was flattened by the 7.8-magnitude Wenchuan earthquake in Sichuan province on May 12 two years ago.
More than 80 percent of the county’s buildings, including the worst-hit Beichuan High School, collapsed, leaving more than 20,000 people homeless.
The entire county has been moved to Yongchang town about 23 km from the former quake site for reconstruction which began last year. The new county will make its debut in October.

China Lets Town’s Ruins Wash Away, in Effort to Avert Disaster Downriver

By EDWARD WONG

BEIJING — Low-lying areas in one of the towns most devastated by the May 12 earthquake were flooded Tuesday as a torrent of water was released from a dangerous lake formed by landslides, dislodging wrecked homes, cars and corpses.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/11/world/asia/11quake.html?_r=1

Beichuan: a vision of hell

Beichuan was a town of 160,000 nestling in one of the world’s most beautiful valleys. When rescuers arrived yesterday, they found a scene of unimaginable devastation and despair

By Clifford Coonan in Beichuan

China remembers Sichuan earthquake victims on first anniversary of disaster
The survivors of the Sichuan earthquake have marked its first anniversary by remembering the 88,000 people who died in China’s worst natural disaster for 30 years.

By Peter Foster in Beijing

Aftershock triggers slides at quake epicenter
Anger over collapsed schools grows as China’s official toll tops 22,000

Ruined Beichuan Starts Anew

by MELISSA BLOCK

When the 7.9 magnitude earthquake hit southwest China on May 12, 2008, Beichuan county was among the hardest hit. Twenty thousand people died in that county alone. In the county seat, it’s believed half the population perished.

Thousands of bodies remain entombed in the rubble of Beichuan. The city is in a deep valley, with mountains on all sides. The force of the earthquake sheared off the sides of those mountains, and the landslides roared straight down onto the city.

The city of Beichuan is abandoned. A fence topped with concertina wire prevents entry. But the ruined city has become a tourist attraction anyway.

Abandoned Gulag Concentration Camp (Sitios fantasma XVI) – 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities – WebUrbanist


Former Soviet Gulag Concentration Camp - WebUrbanist
Former Soviet Gulag Concentration Camp - WebUrbanist

Abandoned Gulag Concentration Camp

A Gulag is a strange type of ‘city’ – more like a nightmare town where work goes unrewarded and the pension plan is deadly. This Soviet gulag was used as a work and prison camp and still has remnant buildings and relics from its desertion. After all, it is difficult to turn something so structured and with such a storied past into anything else that might be more useful.

vía 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities Abandoned Gulag Concentration Camp – WebUrbanist.

History of the Soviet Russian Gulag

The history of the Soviet Russian Gulags, forced labor camps that killed millions of people.

Revelations from the Russian Archives

THE GULAG

Abandoned City & Commune of Oradour, France (Sitios fantasma XV)- 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities – WebUrbanist


Foto: WebUrbanist
Foto: WebUrbanist

Abandoned City & Commune of Oradour, France

During the heat of conflict in World War II, a few informants told German troops that one of their own officers was being held in a nearby French town. What ensued was a terrible massacre that only spared a handful of men and women who managed to escape. Children and women were rounded up into a church and burned alive, men were shot in the legs to die slowly in a barn. Today, the remains of the old city still stand as a memorial to the events of that terrible day and the new commune of Oradour has been relocated to a nearby area.

vía 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities Abandoned City & Commune of Oradour, France – WebUrbanist.

ABANDONED CITY & ORADOUR IN FRANCE

A sad story lies beneath the remains of this sorry looking city. It all started during World War 2, when informants told German troops that one of their officers was being held hostage here.
This turned into a massacre where disturbing events took place, such as children and women were taken to the church and burned alive. The men were shot in the legs and left to die in a barn.
Amazingly a few men and women did actually manage to escape. As you can see in the picture above no one could possibly return – and who would want to?
The city has been left to stand as a memorial and landmark to the people that died on that tragic day. The commune of Oradour however was relocated to a nearby area.

The Masscre of Oradour-sur-Glane (10 June 1944)
from Martyred village: commemorating the 1944 massacre at Oradour-sur-Glane
by Sarah Bennett Farmer

CASE STUDY:
Oradour, June 10th, 1944: A Nazi Massacre in Occupied France
Jean-Jacques Fouché

Oradour-sur-Glane

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Oradour-sur-Glane (OccitanOrador de Glana) is a commune in the Haute-Vienne department in the Limousin region in west-centralFrance.

The original village was destroyed on 10 June 1944, when 642 of its inhabitants, including women and children, were massacred by a German Waffen-SS company. A new village was built after the war on a nearby site and the original has been maintained as a memorial.

Abandoned Resort Town of Yashima, Japan (Sitios fantasma XII) – 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities – WebUrbanist


Imagen: Web Urbanist
Imagen: Web Urbanist

Abandoned Resort Town of Yashima, Japan

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Yashima is a high and open plateau on one of the main islands of Japan. During peak economic years in the 1980s investors decided to create a resort village complete with a half-dozen hotels, curio shops and a rail line to the top of the peak of the city. When the economy fell on harder times and they could not bring in the tourist dollars the entire village was shut down, leaving many shops with eerie remnant collections of collectible tourist goodies and leaving furniture and other relics in the hotels and other support buildings.

vía 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities Abandoned Resort Town of Yashima, Japan – WebUrbanist.

Yashima

Located on Shikoku, one of the major islands of Japan, Yashima is an abandoned tourist resort that was supposed to draw tourists to the area. After all, this is one of the most important pilgrimage sites on Shikoku, with the Yashima Temple rising up at the top of the plateau. It’s also where a very important battle took place during the Genpei War, in 1185.

Yashima Junior High School - Foto: douglaspperkins (Flickr)
Yashima Junior High School - Foto: douglaspperkins (Flickr)

Unfortunately things didn’t quite go according to plan. The economy was surging during the 1980s and entrepreneurs around Takamatsu thought it would be a good idea to invest in tourism and capitalize on the area’s spiritual reputation. They built six hotels, many other theme parks and even an aquarium.

Business was good for a while, but, somewhere along the way people realized there wasn’t much to see in Yashima, so they stopped coming here. The resort’s hotels and gift-shops had to be shut down, and the investors, who had already lost millions of Yen, simply abandoned the project.

Many of the hotel rooms look untouched and some of the tourist shops have their merchandise carefully arranged, making it look like their owners had to leave in a hurry, thus adding to the place eeriness.

Abandoned Yashima

Yashima (or 屋島 which probably won’t display right) is an imposing plateau to the northeast of Takamatsu, the second largest city on Shikoku, one of Japan’s major islands.

ABANDONED YASHIMA RESORT: Shikoku In Japan

The Yashima hotel resort village in Shikoku was intended by investors to be a bustling place with several hotels, restaurants, shops, a rail line and probably more if it were continued.

It was originally build in the 1980’s alongside a popular temple that was seen as an attraction centerpiece to try and draw visitors in.

Abandoned Medieval Town of Balestrino, Italy (Sitios fantasma IX) – 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities – WebUrbanist


Balestrino, Italy - listverse.com
Balestrino, Italy - listverse.com

The origins and much of the history of this slow-built settlement in Tuscany remain unknown, constructed in pieces over many centuries. In the 1100s it was owned by the Benedictine abbey of San Pietro dei Monti. Today the beautiful small town-on-the-bluffs features a castle at the top and partially walled city sprawled on the olive-treed hillside around – but all are completely abandoned. Due to seismic instability the residents were moved out decades ago, leaving behind a perfectly preserved but piecemeal museum of modern and medieval history. Still, visit it soon: the next earthquake in the area may be the last this old town ever sees.

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vía 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities Abandoned Medieval Town of Balestrino, Italy – WebUrbanist.

Balestrino, Italy en listverse.com
Balestrino is quite a strange case in that it was extremely difficult to find any decent information on it. At least on the abandonment itself. No one is quite sure when the town was established, though records date back to before the eleventh century – when Balestrino was owned by the Benedictine abbey of San Pietro dei Monti. As you can see from the pictures, the upper part of the town consists of a Castle (of Marquis) and the lower part a parish church (of Sant’Andrea). Records of population go back to around 1860, when around 800-850 people lived there. Mainly famers who took advantage of the landscape to farm olive trees.

Balestrino – Abandoned Italian hill town – Virtual Globetrotting

Balestrino, Italy is just as picturesque as many other medieval Italian towns, with its stunning hilltop location 70 km southeast of Genoa. Once owned by the Benedictine abbey of San Pietro dei Monti, Balestrino began losing its population in the late 19th century as earthquakes struck the region and damaged property. In 1953, the town was abandoned due to ‘geological instability’. The part of the town that has remained untouched since that time is currently undergoing planning for redevelopment, so it won’t remain abandoned for much longer.

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Abandoned Desert Ghost Town of Kolmanskop, Africa (Sitios fantasma VIII) – 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities – WebUrbanist


Imagen: Web Urbanist
Imagen: Web Urbanist

Abandoned Desert Ghost Town of Kolmanskop, Africa

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A series of structures seemingly displaced in space in time, the remains of a diamond-mining settlement in Africa sits abandoned and partly covered by long-gathered dunes of sand. Tourists have a difficult trek to get to Kolmanskop to see what remains of its strangely Germanic architecture – and then wade through the drifts to get a glimpse of the inside of its structures. Like any good German town the area had a hospital, ballroom, power station, school, theater and casino. When the diamond market crashed it was simply left to be covered over with the sands of time.

vía 24 Tales of Ghost Towns and Abandoned Cities Abandoned Desert Ghost Town of Kolmanskop, Africa – WebUrbanist.

Kolmanskop Ghost Town

Kolmannskuppe is a ghost town in southern Namibia, a few kilometres inland from the port of Lüderitz. It was a small mining village and is now a popular tourist destination run by the joint firm NAMDEB (Namibia-De Beers). It developed after the discovery of diamonds in the area in 1908, to provide shelter for workers from the harsh environment of the Namib Desert.

The village was built like a German town, with facilities like a hospital, ballroom, power station, school, skittle-alley, theater and sport-hall, casino, ice factory and the first x-ray-station in southern Africa. It also had a railway line to Lüderitz.

The town declined after World War I as diamond prices crashed, and operations moved to Oranjemund. It was abandoned in 1956 but has since been partly restored. The geological forces of the desert mean that tourists can now walk through houses knee-deep in sand. (Text Source: Wikipedia)

Kolmanskop a ghost town in the desert of Namibia

Kolmanskop is a ghost town in southern Namibia, a few kilometres inland from the port of Lüderitz. It was a small mining village and is now a popular tourist destination run by the joint firm NAMDEB (Namibia-De Beers).

Imagen: OneStonedCrow (Blog)
Imagen: OneStonedCrow (Blog)

Kolmanskop Ghost Town

The town of Kolmanskop in the harsh Namibia desert was a boom town at one time but is abandoned today except for the steady stream of curious tourists who come daily to see how the sand is reclaiming the town.

Kolmanskop – Ghost Town in the Namib
Diamond Mining Town Reclaimed by the African Desert

Close to Lüderitz in Southern Namibia, the once prosperous diamond-mining town of Kolmanskop is slowly being buried in the white sand of the Namibian Desert.

Read more at Suite101: Kolmanskop – Ghost Town in the Namib: Diamond Mining Town Reclaimed by the African Desert http://namibia-travel.suite101.com/article.cfm/kolmanskop_ghost_mining_town_in_the_namib#ixzz0utdvQok2

Kolmanskop
Namibia

In 1908, Luederitz was plunged into diamond fever. People rushed into the Namib desert hoping to make an easy fortune and within two years, a town, complete with a casino, school, hospital and exclusive residential buildings, had been established in the barren sandy desert. The diamond-bearing gravel was screened and washed in huge recovery plants. Over 1 000 kg of diamonds were extracted before World War I. However, the amount of gemstones greatly diminished after the war. Furthermore, considerably larger diamonds were found to the south near Oranjemund, causing Kolmanskop to become a ghost town.

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