Insanely Intricate Cardboard Columns Have 16 Million Facets and Are the World’s Most Complex Architecture | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World


Inhabitat
Inhabitat

We’re big fans of cardboard architecture, but in most cases, the material yields structures that are boxy and rather simplistic. That’s why we were blown away when we spotted these incredibly intricate cardboard columns by Michael Hansmeyer, which FastcoDesign actually dubbed as the most complex architecture in the world. The dizzying Doric column variations are created on Hansmeyer’s computer using a subdivision algorithm that allows them to have between 8 and 16 million facets (distinct surfaces). They’re so insanely detailed that most people – including us – mistake the actual physical prototypes for computer renderings!

Read more: Insanely Intricate Cardboard Columns Have 16 Million Facets and Are the World’s Most Complex Architecture | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World

vía Insanely Intricate Cardboard Columns Have 16 Million Facets and Are the World’s Most Complex Architecture | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World.

About cardboard architecture – encyclopedia.com

cardboard architecture.
1. Design process using models to show formal and spatial relationships without taking into account the materials or functions of the final buildings.

2. Models with flat surfaces pierced by plain black holes resembling a series of cardboard boxes. The term in this sense has been used to describe the 1960s work of Kahn and others.

Bibliography  Frampton et al. (1975);  Sharp (1978)

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Peter Zumthor Unveils Sheltered Garden for 2011 Serpentine Pavilion | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World


 

Imagen: Inhabitat - inhabitat.com
Imagen: Inhabitat - inhabitat.com

by Cliff Champion

Today 2009 Pritzker Prize-winning architect Peter Zumthor unveiled his contemplative design for London’s annual Serpentine Pavilion exhibition. The 2011 Serpentine pavilion will be unique in that previous architects were required to have previously worked in England, and Zumthor is the first exception to this rule. The proposed offers a zen-like retreat for visitors, who will be guided by a series of pathways and staggered doorways towards an inner garden. Benches surrounding this chamber will offer a quiet space to sit and appreciate the open green space.

Read more: Peter Zumthor Unveils Sheltered Garden for 2011 Serpentine Pavilion | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World

vía Peter Zumthor Unveils Sheltered Garden for 2011 Serpentine Pavilion | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World.

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2011
Peter Zumthor
July – October 2011

The Serpentine Gallery is delighted to reveal the plans for the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2011 by world-renowned Swiss architect Peter Zumthor. This year’s Pavilion is the 11th commission in the Gallery’s annual series, the world’s first and most ambitious architectural programme of its kind. It will be the architect’s first completed building in the UK and will include a specially created garden by the influential Dutch designer Piet Oudolf. more…

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2011 by Peter Zumthor © Peter Zumthor
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2011 by Peter Zumthor © Peter Zumthor

Return Brick Recycling Robot Transforms Rubble into New Bricks | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World


Return Brick - inhabitat.com
Return Brick - inhabitat.com

What if there was a machine that could automatically collect rubble from torn-down buildings and transform the material into new bricks? That’s exactly what designers Youngwoo Park, Hoyoung Lee and Miyeon Kim are proposing with their “Return Brick” recycling machine, which could help keep construction materials out of the landfill. The little robotic machine would search for small fragments of brick and concrete, grind them up, and reform those pieces into new Lego-like bricks, which are easier to stack and build with.

89% of construction waste is brick and concrete, so there is a large amount of material that could be recycled if only it were properly collected. Return Brick is a small robot that rolls around trolling for rubble, sucking up small pieces of concrete and brick. After it has enough material, the crusher begins to break the waste down into even smaller bits and then water or a hardening agent is sprayed onto the material. Next a compressor forms the powdered material into a solid brick and spits it out the side.

vía Return Brick Recycling Robot Transforms Rubble into New Bricks | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World.

Lego-like bricks - Inhabitat
Lego-like bricks - Inhabitat

Broken Bricks Makes Lego Dreams Yanko Design, form beyond function

Concrete is a valuable resource yet we burn thru it like it’s free air so companies around the world are looking for ways to make concrete “greener” and sustainable. Last week I heard about concrete made from hemp so the future is bright but what about all the concrete we have now?

There is a solution. The Broken Bricks recycling machine turns any old concrete into new Lego-like bricks for use in numerous applications. It’s pretty well thought out and I’m sure our construction mavens would love to pile these life sized toys together.

Designers: Youngwoo ParkHoyoung LeeMiyeon Kim

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