Shigeru Ban, de Japón, Premio Pritzker 2014 | The Pritzker Architecture Prize


Shigeru Ban, de Japón, Premio Pritzker 2014 | The Pritzker Architecture Prize

Announcement
Shigeru Ban, a Tokyo-born, 56-year-old architect with offices in Tokyo, Paris and New York, is rare in the field of architecture. He designs elegant, innovative work for private clients, and uses the same inventive and resourceful design approach for his extensive humanitarian efforts. For twenty years Ban has traveled to sites of natural and man-made disasters around the world, to work with local citizens, volunteers and students, to design and construct simple, dignified, low-cost, recyclable shelters and community buildings for the disaster victims.
Reached at his Paris office, Shigeru Ban said, “Receiving this prize is a great honor, and with it, I must be careful. I must continue to listen to the people I work for, in my private residential commissions and in my disaster relief work. I see this prize as encouragement for me to keep doing what I am doing — not to change what I am doing, but to grow.“
In all parts of his practice, Ban finds a wide variety of design solutions, often based around structure, materials, view, natural ventilation and light, and a drive to make comfortable places for the people who use them. From private residences and corporate headquarters, to museums, concert halls and other civic buildings, Ban is known for the originality, economy, and ingeniousness of his works, which do not rely on today’s common high-tech solutions.
The Swiss media company Tamedia asked Ban to create pleasant spaces for their employees. 
He responded by designing a seven-story headquarters with the main structural system entirely 
in timber. The wooden beams interlock, requiring no metal joints.

Swiss Designers of Spas, Tate Modern Follow Le Corbusier – Bloomberg


By Carolyn Bandel

Forget cheese and chocolate. Switzerland’s latest successful export is architects.

Natalie Behring/Bloomberg  Jacques Herzog and Pierre De Meuron created the “Bird’s Nest” for the Beijing Olympics.
Natalie Behring/Bloomberg
Jacques Herzog and Pierre De Meuron created the “Bird’s Nest” for the Beijing Olympics.

The Swiss have proven that architectural prowess needs no translation, with Jacques Herzog and Pierre De Meuron creating the “Bird’s Nest” for the Beijing Olympics and converting a London power plant into the Tate Modern Museum. Bernard Tschumi designed the New Acropolis Museum in Athens and Mario Botta crafted San Francisco’s Museum of Modern Art.

“In a certain sense, we’re the new luxury exports,” Botta, 68, said in an interview at his Mendrisio, Switzerland, office in the southern Alps. “Swatch helps the image of Swiss architecture as well even if it only makes watches.”

Switzerland’s wealth, quality of construction and reputation for precision have promoted a style of architecture that started with Le Corbusier, whose face adorns the Swiss 10- franc note. Yet in the land of Alpine peaks, the tallest building is the new Swiss Prime Tower in Zurich at just 36 stories. Switzerland’s limits on size means architects often go abroad seeking new challenges on a bigger canvas.

“You cannot become a star in Switzerland, the country simply is too small and there aren’t that many big projects where architects can reach international fame,” said Christian Schmid, who teaches at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology or ETH. Still, “there’s a very lively architectural scene in Switzerland with many good architects.”

Swiss Architectural Stars

The Swiss have proven that architectural prowess needs no translation, with Jacques Herzog and Pierre De Meuron creating the “Bird’s Nest” for the Beijing Olympics and converting a London power plant into the Tate Modern Museum, seen here. Source: Tate Press Office via Bloomberg
The Swiss have proven that architectural prowess needs no translation, with Jacques Herzog and Pierre De Meuron creating the “Bird’s Nest” for the Beijing Olympics and converting a London power plant into the Tate Modern Museum, seen here. Source: Tate Press Office via Bloomberg

Since 2001, Switzerland’s Peter Zumthor and partners Herzog and De Meuron have won the annual Pritzker Prize, the most important global prize in architecture. This year’s award went to Chinese architect Wang Shu, whose works feature recycled bricks and salvaged roofing tiles.

Past laureates include Americans such as Frank Gehry, feted for his Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, France’s Jean Nouvel, designer of the Quai Branly Museum in Paris, and Norman Foster, whose iconic Gherkin building in London’s financial district was commissioned by Zurich-based reinsurer Swiss Re (SREN).

“We Swiss are not so susceptible to trends,” Zumthor, 68, said to explain Switzerland’s architectural successes after winning the 2009 Pritzker.

Zumthor built the Serpentine Gallery pavilion in London last year, a summer structure commissioned annually. This year, childhood friends Herzog and De Meuron along with Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, whom they collaborated with in Beijing, are designing the pavilion amid the run-up to London’s Summer Olympics.

Important architects are chosen for the pavilion, “and among the big names in the world, there are just very many Swiss, which is incredible,” Hans-Ulrich Obrist, co-director of the Serpentine Gallery and Swiss, said in a phone interview.

Thermal Spa

“The constraints that Switzerland has, such as the topography, create very interesting and dynamic architecture.”

Such topographical challenges in a nation where 40 percent of the terrain is mountains proved little issue for Zumthor, who built the Vals thermal baths southwest of Davos using 60,000 slabs of local rock.

Besides terrain, costs in a country of almost 8 million residents are also important after the Swiss franc reached near- parity with the euro last year, denting exports.

Local acceptance is crucial to the Swiss style of democracy, with popular votes held to approve large projects. Switzerland’s last big concert hall survived four referendums before it was finished in 2000 by Nouvel on Lake Lucerne. Nouvel also designed packaging for Nestle SA (NESN) to revamp a chocolate brand.

Switzerland’s populace can be “perplexed by large and expensive projects,” Schmid said.

vía Swiss Designers of Spas, Tate Modern Follow Le Corbusier – Bloomberg.

Entradas anteriores en ArquitecturaS:

Herzog & De Meuron y Ai Weiwei vuelven a trabajar juntos – ABC.es

Zumthor, el esencialista de lo sensual

Un Partenón de cristal para los mármoles exiliados · Inaugurado hoy en Atenas

https://twitter.com/#!/arquitectonico/status/185014920159559681



Alejandro Aravena será jurado (nuevamente) para el “Nobel de Arquitectura” – Premio Pritzker


Medalla del Premio Pritzker - www.pritzkerprize.com
Medalla del Premio Pritzker - http://www.pritzkerprize.com

Los organizadores del galardón confirmaron los ocho nombres del jurado que decidirá el próximo ganador del Pritzker.

Agencia EFE

MADRID.- El arquitecto chileno Alejandro Aravena será parte del jurado que decidirá quién será el próximo ganador del premio Pritzker, considerado el equivalente al premio Nobel dentro de la arquitectura.

La Fundación Hyatt, que convoca anualmente este premio, informó de los nuevos nombramientos de la profesional de origen iraquí Zaha Hadid y el juez del Tribunal Supremo de Estados UnidosStephen Breyer, que se suman al jurado que integra Aravena.

Los restantes ocho miembros del grupo que decidirá el premio son el chino Yung Ho Chang, el finlandés Juhani Pallasmaa, el británico lord Peter Palumbo, y las estadounidenses Karen Stein y Martha Thorne.

Thorne, directora ejecutiva del premio, es decana asociada de la Escuela de Arquitectura de la IE University, en Madrid.

El Pritzker fue instituido en 1979 por los fundadores de la cadena hotelera Hyatt, con sede en Chicago, Jay A.Pritzker y su esposa, Cindy, para reconocer el trabajo de profesionales vivos que hubiesen demostrado cualidades como el talento, la visión y el compromiso aplicados a contribuir al desarrollo de la humanidad y su entorno, así como al arte de la arquitectura.

Eduardo Souto de Moura. Foto por Augusto Brázio. www.pritzkerprize.com
Eduardo Souto de Moura. Foto por Augusto Brázio. http://www.pritzkerprize.com

Desde entonces ha recaído en arquitectos como el español Rafael Moneo, el italiano Renzo Piano, el estadounidense Frank O. Gehry, el portugués Álvaro Siza, el japonés Tadao Ando, el mexicano Luis Barragán, los británicos Norman Foster y Richard Rogers, el francés Jean Nouvel o la iraní Zaha Hadid.

El último galardonado, en marzo pasado, fue el portugués Eduardo Souto de Moura.

vía Chileno Alejandro Aravena será jurado para el “Nobel de Arquitectura”.

Quick Takes: Supreme Court justice to judge Pritzker

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer will join the jury for the Pritzker Prize, architecture’s top honor, Pritzker officials said Wednesday.

Joining Breyer on the eight-person jury will be architect Zaha Hadid, who won the prize in 2004.

Ver todos los ganadores del Premio Pritzker (y votar por sus favoritos) – Listas 2ominutos.es

Web Oficial de los Premios Pritzker

Entradas anteriores en ArquitecturaS:

Anuncio Oficial Ganador 2011: Eduardo Souto de Moura (Portugal) – The Pritzker Architecture Prize

La directora de los premios Pritzker critica el uso político de la arquitectura | Vivienda | elmundo.es

Sejima y Nishizawa (SANAA) ganan el premio Pritzker (2010) · ELPAÍS.com

Peter Zumthor recibió el premio Pritzker de Arquitectura – Buenos Aires

Peter Zumthor gana el Premio Pritzker · 2009

* – * – * – * – *
La noticia de hoy en ArquitecturaS (vía Twitter@arquitectonico

https://twitter.com/#!/arquitectonico/status/114399154842775552

Una casa en Mallorca de Álvaro Siza inicia la colección “One” de arquitectura – ABC.es – Noticias Agencias


Alvaro Siza Vieira, 1992 Pritzker Architecture Prize
Alvaro Siza Vieira, 1992 Pritzker Architecture Prize

Siza, que obtuvo en 1992 el Pritzker, considerado el “Nobel” de arquitectura, inaugura esta serie con una casa que diseñó para una familia en Mallorca en un libro que recoge el proyecto desde los dibujos realizados por el autor en la fase de preparación, los planos de plantas, alzados y secciones, así como las maquetas y el trabajo fotográfico realizado por Juan Rodríguez.

El también portugués Souto de Mora pretende con esta colección elaborar un catálogo que pueda ser consultado por estudiantes de arquitectura, arquitectos y por el público en general y que cada obra sea analizada en sí misma.

El título de la serie, “One“, según ha explicado hoy Souto de Mora durante la presentación del libro en el Círculo de Bellas Artes de Madrid, hace referencia a que cada entrega se dedica a una única obra, arquitecto, diseñador o fotógrafo.

Álvaro Siza, uno de los arquitectos portugueses más influyentes del panorama internacional y autor de edificios como la Facultad de Arquitectura de Oporto o el pabellón portugués de la Exposición Universal de Lisboa de 1998, ha explicado las dificultades a la que los estudiantes de arquitectura tienen que enfrentarse para encontrar trabajos con referencias claras de medidas y escalas.

Es una “frustración terrible”, ha señalado Siza, quien ha recordado que se mostró encantado cuando Souto de Mora le propuso que la casa que había diseñado para Mallorca fuera la protagonista de la primera monografía de esta colección.

vía Una casa en Mallorca de Álvaro Siza inicia la colección “One” de arquitectura – ABC.es – Noticias Agencias.

CULTURA

Siza y Souto de Moura presentan una colección de autor

Dos Pritzker mano a mano

Eduardo Souto de Moura. Foto por Augusto Brázio. www.pritzkerprize.com
Eduardo Souto de Moura. Foto por Augusto Brázio. http://www.pritzkerprize.com

¿Qué le preguntaría un Pritzker a otro? La cuestión podría servir de arranque para un acertijo, quizá un chiste. No lo es. El Círculo de Bellas Artes reunió ayer a dos arquitectos portugueses galardonados con el premio, Álvaro Siza, quien lo obtuvo en 1992, y Eduardo Souto de Moura, el último en recogerlo.

Madrid – Gema Pajares
Ambos se han embarcado en un proyecto que presenta a través de una colección de cuadernos una obra singular de un arquitecto, desde sus bocetos iniciales y croquis (tan característica esa mano alzada del maestro luso en apuntes levísimos) hasta su resultado final, a través de las fotografías de Juan Rodríguez. Siza abre el fuego con una casa en Mallorca que levantó para la familia Fluxá. Le seguirán los cuadernos de Moneo y Le Cobursier. Juan Miguel Hernández León, presidente del Círculo de Bellas Artes, gran conocedor de uno y otro, no podía ocultar su satisfacción por la coincidencia de los dos arquitectos.

Tras la presentación Souto de Moura escapa para fumar un cigarrillo en la azotea (encenderá tres a lo largo de una entrevista tórrida –por el sol, no piensen mal–, y constantemente interrumpida por el paso de operarios): «Portugal tiene el techo muy bajo y cuando obtuve el premio sirvió como revulsivo para el país, una gran noticia después de tanta sequía. Bueno, y también levantó mi ego», explica sobre el conocido como «Nobel de la Arquitectura» en un casi perfecto español.

Habla con admiración profunda de don Álvaro, «maestro y mentor, de quien me asombra la manera en que trabaja. Es un hombre de enorme honestidad y perseverante, le admiro. El cariño hay que sentirlo, y yo no puedo matar al padre», asegura después de un par de caladas. Han trabajado juntos mucho, han compartido tanto o más, se conocen demasiado. Por eso cuando reúnen, que es con bastante frecuencia, no hablan de arquitectura, sino de fútbol, apasionados ambos del Benfica (y del Madrid), ahora un poco de capa caída. A los dos les espera un proyecto en el metro de Nápoles.

Círculo de Bellas Artes de Madrid - Darío Álvarez, mayo 2011
Círculo de Bellas Artes de Madrid - Darío Álvarez, mayo 2011
REPORTAJE: Diseño

Un arquitecto, una casa, un libro

El Pritzker Souto de Moura dirige una serie de monográficos sobre viviendas

ELSA FERNÁNDEZ-SANTOS – Madrid 

Casa en Mallorca es el título del primer número de One (Uno), la colección de libros que, dirigidos por el portugués Eduardo Souto de Moura, pretende recuperar la esencia de las publicaciones de arquitectura. Es decir, un libro en forma de cuaderno, con los pliegos del lomo a la vista, manejable pese a que en sus páginas están los dibujos, los alzados y las secciones del proyecto. “Un libro de arquitectura y un libro de fotografía”, dice Souto de Moura recalcando el valor de la serie de fotografías (en este caso de Juan Rodríguez) que en un impoluto blanco y negro recogen, sección por sección, “el sentimiento de la obra”. Un montaje gráfico que enfrenta a la casa teórica con la casa real.

* – * – * – * – *
La noticia de hoy en ArquitecturaS (vía Twitter@arquitectonico

http://twitter.com/#!/arquitectonico/status/82524949767663616

Souto de Moura, técnica y poesía · ELPAÍS.com


Eduardo Souto de Moura. Foto por Augusto Brázio. www.pritzkerprize.com
Eduardo Souto de Moura. Foto por Augusto Brázio. http://www.pritzkerprize.com

TRIBUNA: JUAN MIGUEL HDEZ. LEÓN

“Una inconfundible inteligencia irónica fue la que llevó a Eduardo Souto de Moura – que ayer recibió en Washington el Premio Pritzker de Arquitectura – a afirmar que ‘la ruina deja de ser arquitectura y pasa a ser naturaleza…”

JUAN MIGUEL HDEZ. LEÓN

Una inconfundible inteligencia irónica fue la que llevó a Eduardo Souto de Moura – que ayer recibió en Washington el Premio Pritzker de Arquitectura – a afirmar que “la ruina deja de ser arquitectura y pasa a ser naturaleza”. Era su justificación de la transformación del Convento de Santa Maria de Bouro en una sofisticada y lujosapousada, con el consiguiente escándalo por parte de algunos ortodoxos de la restauración. Los que nunca comprendieron la sutileza de un argumento que conducía a aclarar la utilización de los fragmentos existentes del antiguo monumento, en una operación combinatoria resultante de la relación intuida entre ruina y paisaje.

Siempre se ha relacionado la obra arquitectónica de Souto de Moura con la técnica. Una verdad a medias, a la que no es ajena su inicial, y explícita, inspiración en la obra de Mies van der Rohe. Pero que hay que complementar con su otra definición de la arquitectura como “un acto mental”, una operación que reivindica el pensamiento, y por tanto una cierta forma de “escritura”, para el proyecto arquitectónico.

Porque la precisión en el detalle constructivo, del que la obra de Souto hace gala, no se agota en la voluntad de eficiencia, sino que trasciende en clave poética la dimensión apagada de lo funcional.

El lugar es un instrumento, una herramienta, nos dice Souto de Moura, un pre-texto, añadiría por mi cuenta, que permite un despliegue de interpretaciones bajo la atenta mirada del arquitecto. Como demuestra con la integración paisajística del Estadio de Braga, adosado a una ladera rocosa, que previamente había sido modificada en su perfil mediante la construcción de una serie de terrazas excavadas en la piedra, en un gesto de que incorpora el perfil poniente a la arquitectura, al mismo tiempo que la abre al ámbito urbano. En un último guiño surrealista, toda la sugestión constructiva que el estadio expresa en la exhibición de los pórticos de hormigón, es puesta en cuestión por la gigantesca gárgola diseñada para evacuar el agua de lluvia.

vía Souto de Moura, técnica y poesía · ELPAÍS.com.

Ceremonia Premio Pritzker 2011: Eduardo Souto de Moura, y Barack Obama

Obama felicita a ganador de premio de arquitectura

JIM KUHNHENN

El presidente Barack Obama elogió el jueves al portugués Eduardo Souto de Moura, ganador del Prestigioso Premio de Arquitecura Pritzker, por lograr un estilo que según sus palabras es “tan fluido como hermoso“.

Obama felicitó a Souto de Moura en una ceremonia de premiación en la que el arquitecto recibió el premio Pritzker 2011. El codiciado galardón es calificado muchas veces como el Nobel de la arquitectura.

Obama entrega Pritzker a Souto de Moura

El mandatario entregó el premio al arquitecto portugués en la ciudad de Washington D.C.; el ganador ha diseñado centros comerciales, escuelas y estaciones de metro, entre otros proyectos.

Por: Redacción Obras

Entradas (posts) anteriores en ArquitecturaS:

Eduardo Souto de Moura gana el premio Pritzker de arquitectura · ELPAÍS.com

Anuncio Oficial Ganador 2011: Eduardo Souto de Moura (Portugal) – The Pritzker Architecture Prize

Souto de Moura da sus primeras declaraciones después del galardón: ‘La arquitectura del estrellato acabó’ | Cultura | elmundo.es

* – * – * – * – *
La noticia de hoy en ArquitecturaS (vía Twitter@arquitectonico

http://twitter.com/#!/arquitectonico/status/76939791534526465

Peter Zumthor Unveils Sheltered Garden for 2011 Serpentine Pavilion | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World


 

Imagen: Inhabitat - inhabitat.com
Imagen: Inhabitat - inhabitat.com

by Cliff Champion

Today 2009 Pritzker Prize-winning architect Peter Zumthor unveiled his contemplative design for London’s annual Serpentine Pavilion exhibition. The 2011 Serpentine pavilion will be unique in that previous architects were required to have previously worked in England, and Zumthor is the first exception to this rule. The proposed offers a zen-like retreat for visitors, who will be guided by a series of pathways and staggered doorways towards an inner garden. Benches surrounding this chamber will offer a quiet space to sit and appreciate the open green space.

Read more: Peter Zumthor Unveils Sheltered Garden for 2011 Serpentine Pavilion | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World

vía Peter Zumthor Unveils Sheltered Garden for 2011 Serpentine Pavilion | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World.

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2011
Peter Zumthor
July – October 2011

The Serpentine Gallery is delighted to reveal the plans for the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2011 by world-renowned Swiss architect Peter Zumthor. This year’s Pavilion is the 11th commission in the Gallery’s annual series, the world’s first and most ambitious architectural programme of its kind. It will be the architect’s first completed building in the UK and will include a specially created garden by the influential Dutch designer Piet Oudolf. more…

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2011 by Peter Zumthor © Peter Zumthor
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2011 by Peter Zumthor © Peter Zumthor

Esperando el Premio Pritzker 2010


The Pritzker Architecture Prize 2010
The Pritzker Architecture Prize 2010
@Architizer The Pritzker Prize is awarded Sunday – @archdaily has a poll going and Steven Holl is in the lead. Who do we think will take home the award?

El Premio Pritzker 2010 será anunciado este Domingo 28 de marzo – @archdaily sostiene una encuesta al respecto y Steven Holl está a la cabeza de las preferencias. ¿Quién cree que se llevará el premio a casa este año?

Mi Opinión: desde hace más de un año sostengo que ya es hora de otorgarle este galardón al gran Cesar Pelli – no entiendo cómo aún no está entre los galardonados; suelen comparar al Pritzker con el Nobel y si es por injusticias, la comparación me parece válida.

@darioalvarez

http://listas.20minutos.es/?do=show&id=104775 Mientras esperamos el anuncio del Ganador Pritzker 2010, vota por tu galardonado favorito 😉

Actualización: 28 de marzo de 2010 – Veredicto

Kazuyo Sejima y Ryue Nishizawa (SANAA) – Pritzker Prize 2010 Official Photo Media Kit « ArquitecturaS